The Living Hospital

A hospital is like a living, breathing organism, and the bigger it is the more people and parts are required to keep it together. One thing the recent debacle on The View has shown, is that none of us do our job in a vacuum. So when Joy Behar made her idiotic and condescending comments about Miss Colorado’s “doctor’s stethoscope” she had no idea she would be insulting not just nurses, but the millions of others of professionals who use stethoscopes everyday to do their job. #nursesunite and #showmeyourstethoscope have really shown remarkably well how much passion and dedication people have for this field. There are so many people who make it possible for me to do my job everyday, I wanted to take a little space here to lay them out and thank them.

Environmental services. Not only do they keep our fancy hospital spotless but most of them are among the kindest people working in the hospital, and I am privileged to know them.

Security. Who I know will come and protect me from screaming patients who are trying to assault me and the nurses and PCTs.

Nutrition Services. Several of the gentleman who deliver food are so nice that many patients will ask after them when they are leaving the hospital.

Lab techs. Helping to get all the vital tests patients need.

Patient Care Techs. Unsung heroes. Helping patients eat, go to the bathroom, sit with elderly and combative patients, and many other jobs. They have very difficult jobs doing laborious work for not a lot of pay, they work very closely with patients and build up bonds with them, and they deserve a lot of credit.

Hospital Unit Coordinator: a special category for them because they are really helpful on each unit and really friendly HUCs make your day better.

Social Workers and Case Managers. Always put upon trying to get patients out of the hospital faster and faster. Having to deal with wretched insurance companies. Trying to help steer anxious and despondent families through the process of going to a nursing home- which is now routine and not the exception. We rely on them a great deal.

Therapists: speech, PT, OT; helping our patients regain their functions, sometimes after completely devastating stroke or illness.

Pharmacists: we deal with ever more complicated medications especially with more people living longer and having more diseases and renal and liver problems- our pharmacists are essential partners in working out of medication strategies for patients

Chaplain: this is an obvious need. We see much loss and sorrow in the hospital and we need all the support for families possible.

Porters/Transportation: getting our patients safely from place to place

Radiology techs: especially when we need important tests done really quickly on very sick patients- awesome.

Nurses: the backbone of the hospital. Providing the one on one 24 hour care to patients. As physicians we may only physically round in a patient’s room for 5-10 minutes. We rely on our nurses to be our eyes and ears. Is the blood pressure dropping? Did they spike a fever? Have they urinated all day? Crucial information that the nurse will notice and relay to us.  Is the patient breathing harder? What do their lungs sound like? The nurse will be the one at the bedside that moment to listen and tell me so we can make a plan together. Do we have a critically ill patient we know is going to die? In that case I will have come in, talked to the family, comforted them and the patient- but who is in the room when the patient’s heart stops beating? Not me, the nurse. She or he will call me and let me know, but they will be the ones with that patient and family in those final moments. Indispensable.

Advanced practitioners: working alongside physicians in many different capacities to treat patients. Including PAs and NPs, there is a very broad range of skill sets and duties.

And that leaves doctors. There are a lot of us in a lot of different specialties coming together to figure out solutions on really sick and complicated patients. Without all the other people above, though, we’d just be blowing a lot of hot air.

2 Comments

  1. Dee says:

    An absolutely beautiful and truthful post!! I love the hospital and everyone I work with, from the house-keepers to the physicians. It takes each and everyone of us working together to be able to provide our patients with care and compassion that they need.

    Dee RN

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: